KIPAC Blog

by Lori Ann White In the series, "Where are they now?" we check in with KIPAC alumni: where they are now, how they've fared since their days exploring particle astrophysics and cosmology at the Institute, and how their KIPAC experiences have shaped their journeys. Jeff Oishi, a KIPAC post-doctoral researcher from 2010 to 2012, is currently a Assistant Professor... Read More
By Christina Ignarra for the LUX collaboration   The Black Hills of South Dakota have long held a powerful lure for gold-hungry prospectors, deep in their heart.  But now, physicists are looking to discover a new form of treasure down in the former Homestake gold mine, nearly a mile underground those long-fabled Black Hills.  Our LUX collaboration is searching for... Read More
In the series, "Where are they now?" we check in with KIPAC alumni: where they are now, how they've fared since their days exploring particle astrophysics and cosmology at the Institute, and how their KIPAC experiences have shaped their journeys. Maruša Bradač, a KIPAC post-doctoral researcher from 2004-2007, is currently an associate professor of physics at UC... Read More
By Lori Ann White In the series, "Where are they now?" we continue to check in with KIPAC alumni: where they are now, how they've fared since their days exploring particle astrophysics and cosmology at the Institute, and how their KIPAC experiences have shaped their journeys.  In this installment, we talk with Ted Baltz, who is now a programmer for Google. After... Read More
Dear KIPACers, Welcome back to our newsletter. Lots of exciting things going at the Institute as always. This one comes just in time before our holiday party on Friday that I hope you all can make it to. We welcome a lot of new people and we can be very happy about all the progress we have seen in the last few months. Please also have a look at all the upcoming... Read More
By: Kristi Schneck Over the past few years, several dark matter direct detection experiments have released results implying that dark matter may be hiding in an unexpected place.  These results suggest that dark matter particles may be ten times lighter than many physicists originally believed.  The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) collaboration, which includes... Read More
by Lori Ann White   An Interview with KIPAC alum Matt Turk In the new series, "Where are they now?" we check in with KIPAC alumni: where they are now, how they have fared since their days exploring particle astrophysics and cosmology at the Institute, and how their KIPAC experiences have shaped their journeys. First up is Matt Turk, a KIPAC graduate student from... Read More
By Greg Madejski The concept of a black hole seems to be shrouded in mystery, perhaps partly because of the enigmatic name, but in reality it is a very simple one:  a black hole is an object containing an enormous quantity of mass shrunk down to a tiny volume - so much so that the speed required to escape the pull of this compact object’s gravity would exceed even... Read More
By Josh Meyers One of the chief goals of current and planned astronomy surveys is to determine the nature of dark energy - the name given to the mysterious ‘substance’ that appears to be making the expansion of the Universe proceed faster and faster over time in surprising opposition to the expectations of nearly all cosmologists only a couple of short decades ago... Read More
By William E. East One of the more graphic terms in black hole physics is "spaghettification."  It refers to the way that strongly varying gravitational forces can distort a round object into a shape most familiar from your dinner plate. This is a fate that can befall a star that has the misfortune to wander too close to a massive black hole. In this post, I want to... Read More

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