KIPAC Blog

Authors Canning and Werner standing in front of SOFIA.
By Rebecca Canning and Norbert Werner The atmosphere that enshrouds the Earth and provides us with wonderful things—like air to breathe, and beautiful sunrises and sunsets, and rainbows—unfortunately also absorbs light at many wavelengths and limits us from having a transparently clear view of the universe. To be certain, the visible wavelength light entering our... Read More
Stanford physics undergrad Albert Wandui. (Photo courtesy Albert Wandui.)
By Lori Ann White Above: Albert sporting a shirt that contains all the particles of the current Standard Model of particle physics (which is now known to be incomplete because it misses dark matter, for one.) (Photo courtesy Albert Wandui.) On Friday, Dec. 4, while the vast majority of Stanford undergraduates were prepping for finals and planning for their holiday... Read More
Dear KIPACers, We have many wonderful news items to share with you before this winter break. E.g. that the annual report is out, a number of recognitions of KIPAC members, some nice science results and some good news for our projects. We hope you will have a restful break and are looking forward to seeing you back for an exciting 2016. Happy Holidays!   Best, Tom... Read More
As I continue to talk about the details of deconstructing and rebuilding a telescope, there’s some science that has to be understood. As mentioned before, one of the key tasks of the inner structure of the telescope is to keep the detectors cold enough to do their job. Here’s a brief discussion of the science understanding a reader needs for future blog posts to make... Read More
I spent the first weekend mostly acclimating. Adjusting to these conditions (literally the highest, driest, and coldest place on Earth) takes some time and the opposite of effort. Sitting down, taking it easy, and feeling like a freeloader. But as of Monday morning it was time to earn my keep. Here’s a picture of my morning commute. This morning it was -27 F, which... Read More
By Val Monticue Getting to the South Pole spans six days, five flights, four countries, three continents, two militaries, and a partridge in a pear tree. I went via the New Zealand Route, because I was going to the South Pole. Only people going to Palmer Station on the coast, or on one of the research vessels, take the South America route. The New Zealand route... Read More
By Lori Ann White In the series, "Where are they now?" we check in with KIPAC alumni: where they are now, how they've fared since their days exploring particle astrophysics and cosmology at the Institute, and how their KIPAC experiences have shaped their journeys. Next up is Jodi Cooley, who was a postdoctoral researcher at KIPAC from 2004–2009.  Cooley, who is... Read More
Getting to the South Pole spans six days, five flights, four countries, three continents, two militaries, and a partridge in a pear tree. I’m on the New Zealand Route, because I was going to the South Pole. Only people going to Palmer Station or one of the research vessels take the South America route. It looks a lot longer in the figure below, but it’s really only a... Read More
By Amy Furniss   Gamma-ray blazars (also known as “BL Lac objects”) are among the most extreme galaxies, whipping up and then flinging out into intergalactic space particles at energies far beyond those attainable by the most powerful particle accelerators on Earth. The study of the variable gamma-ray emission from these energetic galaxies is possible through... Read More
By Lori Ann White Above: Val Monticue [Credit: Sarah Reece]. Meet Val Monticue, a systems engineer turned physics teacher. Val has spent the last two summers at Stanford University through Industry Initiatives for Science and Math Education (IISME), a nonprofit, industry-education partnership that gives teachers the opportunity to gain real-world experience in... Read More

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