KIPAC Blog

SULI students
By Lori Ann White We recently caught up with five of the undergraduate physics students who spent their summer at KIPAC through the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) program. SULI, sponsored by the Department of Energy, gives talented undergraduates the opportunity to participate in cutting-edge research at a DOE laboratory; the summer sessions... Read More
Dear KIPACers,   We have many wonderful news items to share with you -- new arrivals and new KIPAC alumni, science highlights and awards, curriculum updates. Classes started today, September 21st. We have much to look forward to in this new academic year.   Tom for the KIPAC management team Tom, Pat, Ziba, Greg, and Risa Disclaimer: We strive for accurate... Read More
Aurelien Bouvier
In the series, "Where are they now?" we check in with KIPAC alumni: where they are now, how they've fared since their days exploring particle astrophysics and cosmology at the Institute, and how their KIPAC experiences have shaped their journeys. Next up is Aurelien Bouvier, a KIPAC graduate student from 2005 to 2010, whose time at KIPAC working on the Fermi Gamma... Read More
Grav Atom
  By Xinlu Huang and Masha Baryakhtar Why are there no "gravitational atoms"?  Our world is made up of atoms: i.e. nuclei and electrons held together by electromagnetism. At the same time, though not all particles have electric charge, they all have a gravitational “charge” (i.e. their mass). And gravity is universal and attractive. So it is only natural to ask:... Read More
At telescope
In the series, "Where are they now?" we check in with KIPAC alumni: where they are now, how they've fared since their days exploring particle astrophysics and cosmology at the Institute, and how their KIPAC experiences have shaped their journeys. Next up is Chihway Chang, a graduate student at KIPAC from 2007–2013, who is currently a postdoctoral researcher at the... Read More
LSST site on Cerro Pachón, Chile
Dear KIPACers, We have many wonderful news items to share with you -- new arrivals and departures, science highlights and awards, and open house fun and curriculum reform. Please send us any corrections and additions. Have a fabulous long weekend, Tom for the KIPAC management team Tom, Pat, Ziba, Greg and Risa Newsletter The KIPAC postdoc committee, led by Roger... Read More
The question of whether we receive microwave radiation from spinning dust grains in our Galaxy has been debated for 15 years. A collaboration including a KIPAC scientist has provided valuable data indicating that the answer is probably yes. The ARCADE 2 instrument being launched on a high altitude balloon. Getting above the atmosphere is important in an absolute... Read More
A KIPAC astrophysicist has published some of the first constraints on dark energy and other cosmological parameters using the measured signal from "shadows" of galaxy clusters in the CMB. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT), located in the Atacama desert in Chile. Multiple probes of the Universe’s expansion rate suggest a concordant model where dark matter and... Read More
For the first time, thanks to the Fermi Space Telescope, high energy gamma rays gave been detected coming from another spiral galaxy much like our own Milky Way. It is now evident that the differences in gamma-ray luminosity among galaxies show that the density of cosmic rays varies and is correlated with the formation of new stars. The intensity of gamma-rays... Read More
By most accounts, the Milky Way is a fairly unexceptional galaxy in the Universe at large. However, a team of KIPAC scientists has shown that it has one very unusual feature: its two lesser companions, the Magellanic Clouds. Images of systems from the SDSS spectroscopic catalog where Milky Way-like hosts have two Magellenic Cloud-like companions Readily visible... Read More

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