KIPAC Blog

By Lori Ann White In the series, "Where are they now?" we check in with KIPAC alumni: where they are now, how they've fared since their days exploring particle astrophysics and cosmology at the Institute, and how their KIPAC experiences have shaped their journeys. Next up is Jodi Cooley, who was a postdoctoral researcher at KIPAC from 2004–2009.  Cooley, who is... Read More
Getting to the South Pole spans six days, five flights, four countries, three continents, two militaries, and a partridge in a pear tree. I’m on the New Zealand Route, because I was going to the South Pole. Only people going to Palmer Station or one of the research vessels take the South America route. It looks a lot longer in the figure below, but it’s really only a... Read More
By Amy Furniss   Gamma-ray blazars (also known as “BL Lac objects”) are among the most extreme galaxies, whipping up and then flinging out into intergalactic space particles at energies far beyond those attainable by the most powerful particle accelerators on Earth. The study of the variable gamma-ray emission from these energetic galaxies is possible through... Read More
By Lori Ann White Above: Val Monticue [Credit: Sarah Reece]. Meet Val Monticue, a systems engineer turned physics teacher. Val has spent the last two summers at Stanford University through Industry Initiatives for Science and Math Education (IISME), a nonprofit, industry-education partnership that gives teachers the opportunity to gain real-world experience in... Read More
Interstellar Gas
By  Luigi Tibaldo The biggest “lab” The Universe is a giant laboratory that we can use to test the laws of physics in extreme conditions not accessible on Earth, to investigate events that happened in remote eras long ago, and to probe the many unknowns of the cosmos. However - it is sometimes difficult to disentangle the possible signatures of exotic or... Read More
SULI students
By Lori Ann White We recently caught up with five of the undergraduate physics students who spent their summer at KIPAC through the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) program. SULI, sponsored by the Department of Energy, gives talented undergraduates the opportunity to participate in cutting-edge research at a DOE laboratory; the summer sessions... Read More
Dear KIPACers,   We have many wonderful news items to share with you -- new arrivals and new KIPAC alumni, science highlights and awards, curriculum updates. Classes started today, September 21st. We have much to look forward to in this new academic year.   Tom for the KIPAC management team Tom, Pat, Ziba, Greg, and Risa Disclaimer: We strive for accurate... Read More
Aurelien Bouvier
In the series, "Where are they now?" we check in with KIPAC alumni: where they are now, how they've fared since their days exploring particle astrophysics and cosmology at the Institute, and how their KIPAC experiences have shaped their journeys. Next up is Aurelien Bouvier, a KIPAC graduate student from 2005 to 2010, whose time at KIPAC working on the Fermi Gamma... Read More
Grav Atom
  By Xinlu Huang and Masha Baryakhtar Why are there no "gravitational atoms"?  Our world is made up of atoms: i.e. nuclei and electrons held together by electromagnetism. At the same time, though not all particles have electric charge, they all have a gravitational “charge” (i.e. their mass). And gravity is universal and attractive. So it is only natural to ask:... Read More
At telescope
In the series, "Where are they now?" we check in with KIPAC alumni: where they are now, how they've fared since their days exploring particle astrophysics and cosmology at the Institute, and how their KIPAC experiences have shaped their journeys. Next up is Chihway Chang, a graduate student at KIPAC from 2007–2013, who is currently a postdoctoral researcher at the... Read More

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