KIPAC Blog

Interstellar Gas
By  Luigi Tibaldo The biggest “lab” The Universe is a giant laboratory that we can use to test the laws of physics in extreme conditions not accessible on Earth, to investigate events that happened in remote eras long ago, and to probe the many unknowns of the cosmos. However - it is sometimes difficult to disentangle the possible signatures of exotic or... Read More
SULI students
By Lori Ann White We recently caught up with five of the undergraduate physics students who spent their summer at KIPAC through the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) program. SULI, sponsored by the Department of Energy, gives talented undergraduates the opportunity to participate in cutting-edge research at a DOE laboratory; the summer sessions... Read More
Dear KIPACers,   We have many wonderful news items to share with you -- new arrivals and new KIPAC alumni, science highlights and awards, curriculum updates. Classes started today, September 21st. We have much to look forward to in this new academic year.   Tom for the KIPAC management team Tom, Pat, Ziba, Greg, and Risa Disclaimer: We strive for accurate... Read More
Aurelien Bouvier
In the series, "Where are they now?" we check in with KIPAC alumni: where they are now, how they've fared since their days exploring particle astrophysics and cosmology at the Institute, and how their KIPAC experiences have shaped their journeys. Next up is Aurelien Bouvier, a KIPAC graduate student from 2005 to 2010, whose time at KIPAC working on the Fermi Gamma... Read More
Grav Atom
  By Xinlu Huang and Masha Baryakhtar Why are there no "gravitational atoms"?  Our world is made up of atoms: i.e. nuclei and electrons held together by electromagnetism. At the same time, though not all particles have electric charge, they all have a gravitational “charge” (i.e. their mass). And gravity is universal and attractive. So it is only natural to ask:... Read More
At telescope
In the series, "Where are they now?" we check in with KIPAC alumni: where they are now, how they've fared since their days exploring particle astrophysics and cosmology at the Institute, and how their KIPAC experiences have shaped their journeys. Next up is Chihway Chang, a graduate student at KIPAC from 2007–2013, who is currently a postdoctoral researcher at the... Read More
LSST site on Cerro Pachón, Chile
Dear KIPACers, We have many wonderful news items to share with you -- new arrivals and departures, science highlights and awards, and open house fun and curriculum reform. Please send us any corrections and additions. Have a fabulous long weekend, Tom for the KIPAC management team Tom, Pat, Ziba, Greg and Risa Newsletter The KIPAC postdoc committee, led by Roger... Read More
The Fermi LAT has observed, for the first time, gamma-rays produced in cosmic-ray interactions in several neighboring galaxies - and is even able to spatially resolve one of those galaxies. This has given us a unique global view of cosmic ray acceleration, that previous Milky Way studies could not provide. Gamma-ray emission from the LMC While the Fermi LAT has... Read More
Creating the first ever catalog of the entire Galactic plane in hard x-rays, a KIPAC scientist has paved the way for a deeper understanding of the most luminous compact objects in our Galaxy, and of the x-ray emission from other galaxies. Map of catalogued hard x-ray emitters in the Galactic center region with their significance in signal to noise Being high... Read More
Of the four established ways to study dark matter astronomically, looking at the evolving properties of galaxy clusters is the most reliant on non-optical observations of our Universe. A KIPAC faculty member has proposed satellite observations for a new era of cluster constraints on dark energy. One of the major questions in contemporary physics and astronomy is the... Read More

Pages